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dc.contributor.authorROBINSON, ANTHONYen
dc.contributor.authorMURRAY, DARINAen
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-21T13:47:28Z
dc.date.available2013-08-21T13:47:28Z
dc.date.createdSept. 4-7en
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.date.submitted2012en
dc.identifier.citationDonnelly, A.J. Robinson, Y.M.C. Delaure, D.B. Murray, Sliding bubble dynamics and the effects on surface heat transfer, Journal of Physics: Conference Series, EUROTHERM 2012, Potiers, France, Sept. 4-7, 2012, 012180-en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/67186
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.descriptionPotiers, Franceen
dc.description.abstractAn investigation into the eff ects of a single sliding air bubble on heat transfer from a submerged, inclined surface has been undertaken. Existing literature has shown that both vapour and gas bubbles can increase heat transfer rates from adjacent heated surfaces. However, the mechanisms involved are complex and dynamic and in some cases poorly understood. The present study utilises high speed, high resolution, infrared thermography and video photography to measure two dimensional surface heat transfer and three dimensional bubble position and shape. This provides a unique insight into the complex interactions at the heated surface. Bubbles of volume 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 ml were released onto a surface inclined at 30 degrees to horizontal. Results con rmed that sliding bubbles can enhance heat transfer rates up to a factor of 9 and further insight was gained about the mechanisms behind this phenomenon. The enhancement e ects were observed over large areas and persisted for a long duration with the bubble exhibiting complex shape and path oscillations. It is believed that the periodic wake structure present behind the sliding bubble a ects the bubble motion and is responsible for the heat transfer e ects observed. The nature of this wake is proposed to be that of a chain of horseshoe vortices.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors would like to acknowledge the nancial support of Science Foundation Ireland under grant number ENM2151 and the Industrial Development Agency (IDA) Ireland funding towards Bell Labs Ireland.en
dc.format.extent012180en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectsingle sliding air bubbleen
dc.subject.lcshsingle sliding air bubbleen
dc.titleSliding bubble dynamics and the effects on surface heat transferen
dc.title.alternativeJournal of Physics: Conference Seriesen
dc.title.alternativeEUROTHERM 2012en
dc.typeConference Paperen
dc.contributor.sponsorScience Foundation Ireland (SFI)en
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/arobinsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/dmurrayen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid81666en
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/395/1/012180en
dc.contributor.sponsorGrantNumberENM2151en
dc.identifier.rssurihttp://www.let.ensma.fr/eurotherm2012/papers/03936-fichier2.pdfen


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