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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/59972

Title: The labour market characteristics and labour market impacts of immigrants in Ireland
Author: Barrett, Alan
Bergin, Adele
Duffy, David
Keywords: Labour market
Immigrants
Ireland
Low skilled labour
High skilled labour
Issue Date: 2006
Publisher: Economic & Social Research Institute
Citation: Barrett, Alan; Bergin, Adele; Duffy, David. 'The labour market characteristics and labour market impacts of immigrants in Ireland'. - Economic & Social Review, Vol. 37, No. 1, Spring, 2006, pp. 1-26, Dublin: Economic & Social Research Institute
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is twofold. We first produce a labour market profile of non- Irish immigrants who arrived in Ireland in the ten years to 2003. We then go on to use the labour market profile in estimating the impact of immigration (non-Irish) on the Irish labour market. Immigrants are shown to be a highly educated group. However, they are not all employed in occupations that fully reflect their education levels. The model of the labour market that we use to simulate the impact of immigration differentiates between low-skilled and high-skilled labour. This allows us to estimate the impact of immigrants (a) if they were employed at a level fitting their education and (b) if they were employed in occupations below their educational level. Our results show that under scenario (a) immigrants who arrived between 1993 and 2003 increased GNP by between 3.5 and 3.7 per cent, largely by lowering skilled wages by around 6 per cent and increasing Ireland’s competitiveness. Under scenario (b), the increase in GNP is reduced to 3 per cent because the impact on skilled wages is lower. If we assume that immigration is primarily unskilled, the impact on earnings inequality found under (a) and (b) is reversed.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2262/59972
ISSN: 00129984
Appears in Collections:Economic and Social Review Archive: Complete Collection 1969-
The Economic and Social Review, Vol. 37, No. 1, Spring, 2006

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