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dc.contributor.authorLAWLOR, BRIANen
dc.contributor.authorCOEN, ROBERTen
dc.contributor.authorO'MARA, SHANE MICHAELen
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-29T15:52:58Z
dc.date.available2011-08-29T15:52:58Z
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.date.submitted2011en
dc.identifier.citationMuireann Irish, Brian A Lawlor, Robert F Coen, Shane M O'Mara, Everyday episodic memory in amnestic mild cognitive impairment: a preliminary investigation, BMC Neuroscience, 12, 2011, 80-en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/59133
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractBackground: Decline in episodic memory is one of the hallmark features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is also a defining feature of amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), which is posited as a potential prodrome of AD. While deficits in episodic memory are well documented in MCI, the nature of this impairment remains relatively under-researched, particularly for those domains with direct relevance and meaning for the patient's daily life. In order to fully explore the impact of disruption to the episodic memory system on everyday memory in MCI, we examined participants' episodic memory capacity using a battery of experimental tasks with real-world relevance. We investigated episodic acquisition and delayed recall (story-memory), associative memory (face-name pairings), spatial memory (route learning and recall), and memory for everyday mundane events in 16 amnestic MCI and 18 control participants. Furthermore, we followed MCI participants longitudinally to gain preliminary evidence regarding the possible predictive efficacy of these real-world episodic memory tasks for subsequent conversion to AD. Results: The most discriminating tests at baseline were measures of acquisition, delayed recall, and associative memory, followed by everyday memory, and spatial memory tasks, with MCI patients scoring significantly lower than controls. At follow-up (mean time elapsed: 22.4 months), 6 MCI cases had progressed to clinically probable AD. Exploratory logistic regression analyses revealed that delayed associative memory performance at baseline was a potential predictor of subsequent conversion to AD. Conclusions: As a preliminary study, our findings suggest that simple associative memory paradigms with real-world relevance represent an important line of enquiry in future longitudinal studies charting MCI progression over time.en
dc.format.extent80en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBMC Neuroscienceen
dc.relation.ispartofseries12en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectNeuroscienceen
dc.subjectAlzheimer's disease (AD)en
dc.subjectepisodic memoryen
dc.titleEveryday episodic memory in amnestic mild cognitive impairment: a preliminary investigationen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/smomaraen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/lawlorbaen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/rcoenen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid74769en
dc.identifier.rssurihttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2202/12/80en
dc.identifier.rssurihttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2202/12/80en


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