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dc.contributor.authorMc Lysaght, Aoifeen
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-16T14:57:39Z
dc.date.available2011-08-16T14:57:39Z
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.date.submitted2010en
dc.identifier.citationMakino, T. McLysaght, A., Ohnologs in the human genome are dosage balanced and frequently associated with disease, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 107, 20, 2010, 9270-9274en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/58716
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.descriptionPMID: 20439718en
dc.description.abstractAbout 30% of protein-coding genes in the human genome are related through two whole genome duplication (WGD) events. Although WGD is often credited with great evolutionary importance, the processes governing the retention of these genes and their biological significance remain unclear. One increasingly popular hypothesis is that dosage balance constraints are a major determinant of duplicate gene retention. We test this hypothesis and show that WGD-duplicated genes (ohnologs) have rarely experienced subsequent small-scale duplication (SSD) and are also refractory to copy number variation (CNV) in human populations and are thus likely to be sensitive to relative quantities (i.e., they are dosage-balanced). By contrast, genes that have experienced SSD in the vertebrate lineage are more likely to also display CNV. This supports the hypothesis of biased retention of dosage-balanced genes after WGD. We also show that ohnologs have a strong association with human disease. In particular, Down Syndrome (DS) caused by trisomy 21 is widely assumed to be caused by dosage effects, and 75% of previously reported candidate genes for this syndrome are ohnologs that experienced no other copy number changes. We propose the remaining dosage-balanced ohnologs on chromosome 21 as candidate DS genes. These observations clearly show a persistent resistance to dose changes in genes duplicated by WGD. Dosage balance constraints simultaneously explain duplicate gene retention and essentiality after WGDen
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Laurent Duret for helpful comments and Science Gallery, Trinity College Dublin, for stimulating interactions. This work is supported by Science Foundation Ireland.en
dc.format.extent9270-9274en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of Americaen
dc.relation.ispartofseries107en
dc.relation.ispartofseries20en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectGeneticsen
dc.subjectwhole genome duplicationen
dc.subjectcopy number variationen
dc.subjectDown Syndromeen
dc.subjecttrisomy 21en
dc.titleOhnologs in the human genome are dosage balanced and frequently associated with diseaseen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/mclysagaen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid71085en
dc.subject.TCDThemeGenes & Societyen
dc.identifier.rssurihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0914697107en
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0003-2552-6220en


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