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  • Past, present and future: Computational approaches to mapping historical Irish cognate verb forms 

    FRANSEN, THEODORUS LEMAN (Trinity College Dublin. School of Linguistic Speech & Comm Sci. C.L.C.S., 2019)
    This thesis investigates how computational methods can be employed to enhance our understanding of the significant developments in the verbal system between Old Irish (c. 8th?9th centuries A.D.) and Modern Irish (13th ...
  • Predicting dual-language literacy attainment in Irish-English bilinguals: language-specific and language-universal contributions 

    Barnes, Emily (Trinity College Dublin. School of Linguistic Speech & Comm Sci. C.L.C.S., 2021)
    This thesis focuses on dual-language literacy attainment and has three main aims. The first is to examine various predictors of early literacy attainment in Irish and English – phonemic awareness, rapid automatised naming ...
  • Principles of English spelling formation 

    RYAN, DES (Trinity College Dublin. School of Linguistic Speech & Comm Sci. C.L.C.S., 2018)
    Studies of English spelling have primarily focussed on correspondences between spelling and sound among core, standard spellings. Segmental-level correspondences have been examined in detail (Venezky 1970, Cummings 1988, ...
  • Professionalising in a freelance eco-system 

    VENTURI, LUCIA (Trinity College Dublin. School of Linguistic Speech & Comm Sci. C.L.C.S., 2020)
    This study takes a Classic Grounded Theory (CGT) approach to identifying the key concern of Irish Sign Language interpreters with respect to their professional practice and how they resolve the main concern. The rationale ...
  • Wug-testing phonetic prominence in Munster Irish 

    Mccabe, Connor Peter (2021)
    8 speakers of Munster Irish were presented with a series of disyllabic nonwords and directed to read them aloud in a carrier phrase. Each nonword corresponded to a different pairing of syllable weights (e.g. light-heavy, ...