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dc.contributor.authorMc Lysaght, Aoifeen
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-09T09:49:28Z
dc.date.available2010-08-09T09:49:28Z
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.date.submitted2010en
dc.identifier.citationP?rez-Bercoff A, Makino T, McLysaght A, Duplicability of self-interacting human genes., BMC Evolutionary Biology, 10, 160, 2010en
dc.identifier.issn1471-2148en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/40406
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractBackground: There is increasing interest in the evolution of protein-protein interactions because this should ultimately be informative of the patterns of evolution of new protein functions within the cell. One model proposes that the evolution of new protein-protein interactions and protein complexes proceeds through the duplication of self-interacting genes. This model is supported by data from yeast. We examined the relationship between gene duplication and self-interaction in the human genome. Results: We investigated the patterns of self-interaction and duplication among 34808 interactions encoded by 8881 human genes, and show that self-interacting proteins are encoded by genes with higher duplicability than genes whose proteins lack this type of interaction. We show that this result is robust against the system used to define duplicate genes. Finally we compared the presence of self-interactions amongst proteins whose genes have duplicated either through whole-genome duplication (WGD) or small-scale duplication (SSD), and show that the former tend to have more interactions in general. After controlling for age differences between the two sets of duplicates this result can be explained by the time since the gene duplication. Conclusions: Genes encoding self-interacting proteins tend to have higher duplicability than proteins lacking self-interactions. Moreover these duplicate genes have more often arisen through whole-genome rather than small-scale duplication. Finally, self-interacting WGD genes tend to have more interaction partners in general in the PIN, which can be explained by their overall greater age. This work adds to our growing knowledge of the importance of contextual factors in gene duplicability.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesBMC Evolutionary Biologyen
dc.relation.ispartofseries10en
dc.relation.ispartofseries160en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectGeneticsen
dc.subjectgene duplicabilityen
dc.titleDuplicability of self-interacting human genes.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.sponsorScience Foundation Ireland (SFI)en
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/mclysagaen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid67911en
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2148-10-160en
dc.subject.TCDThemeGenes & Societyen
dc.identifier.rssurihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2148-10-160en
dc.identifier.orcid_id0000-0003-2552-6220en


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