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dc.contributor.authorBYRNE, RUTH MARY JOSEPHINEen
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-13T14:45:52Z
dc.date.available2010-05-13T14:45:52Z
dc.date.issued2000en
dc.date.submitted2000en
dc.identifier.citationMcCloy, R. A. & Byrne, R.M.J., Counterfactual thinking about controllable events, Memory & Cognition, 28, 2000, 1071 - 1078en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/39512
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractWhen people think about what might have been, they mentally undo controllable rather than uncontrollable events. We report the results of two experiments in which we examined this controllability effect in counterfactual thinking. The experiments show that the mutability of controllable events is influenced by the perceived appropriateness or inappropriateness of the events. The first experiment shows that people change inappropriate controllable actions more than appropriate controllable ones. The second experiment shows that people mutate inappropriate controllable events whether the outcome is exceptional or normal with respect to intrapersonal habitual norms, and whether the outcome is positive or negative. We discuss the implications for alternative theories of counterfactual thinking.en
dc.format.extent1071en
dc.format.extent1078en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMemory & Cognitionen
dc.relation.ispartofseries28en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.titleCounterfactual thinking about controllable eventsen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/rmbyrneen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid6159en


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