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dc.contributor.authorHARDING, TIMOTHY DAVID
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-22T13:41:26Z
dc.date.available2010-03-22T13:41:26Z
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.date.submitted2010en
dc.identifier.otherY
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/38847
dc.descriptionACCEPTEDen
dc.description.abstractTwentieth century scholars, critically re-examining Ireland?s origin myths, explained how `synthetic pseudo-history? such as the Lebor Gabala Erenn arose. Sports, like nations, have need of origin myths, chess being no exception; moreover, sporting preferences have sometimes become bound up with a nation?s sense of its unique identity. In the same ancient manuscripts where Celtic revivalists found legends of the earliest people in Ireland, they often also found references to board-games. What may be called the myth of Celtic Chess then emerged. The weak version stated that the pre-Norman Irish played chess; the strong form, more rarely seen, actually claimed a native origin for the game. The myth was especially publicised during the period of re-awakening Gaelic identity from the 1880s to the First World War and persists in some quarters to this day. This article examines the role that chess, and board games of skill that were mistaken for chess, played in Irish cultural nationalism, particularly in the nineteenth century.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesIrish Historical Studies;
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectchessen
dc.subjectcultural nationalismen
dc.subjectIrelanden
dc.title'A Fenian Pastime'?: early Irish board games and their identification with chessen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/hardingt
dc.identifier.rssinternalid55636


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