Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHARDING, TIMOTHY DAVID
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-22T10:05:47Z
dc.date.available2010-03-22T10:05:47Z
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.date.submitted2009en
dc.identifier.otherY
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/38846
dc.descriptionACCEPTEDen
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the origin and growth of chess columns in English periodicals. The space devoted by many magazines and newspapers to games and puzzles is a research topic that has mainly been ignored by scholars. Nowadays we are familiar with crosswords, sudoku, and bridge columns. Some Victorian periodicals printed brainteasers of various kinds, but between the 1850s and 1914 chess problems were the most common form of intellectual exercise in periodicals. Chess grew from a feature seen in a handful of titles at mid-century into one that was almost required reading in a weekly paper by the 1880s, sometimes as part of an ?amusements? package. The columns themselves were an important driver of growth for chess, showing examples of good play, offering advice of various kinds, and running competitions, as well as providing puzzles for readers to solve.en
dc.format.extent359-391en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVictorian Periodicals Review;
dc.relation.ispartofseriesxlii;
dc.relation.ispartofseries4;
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectChessen
dc.subjectEnglish periodicalsen
dc.titleKings and queens at home: a short history of the chess column in 19th century English periodicalsen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/hardingt
dc.identifier.rssinternalid55637


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record