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dc.contributor.authorNormand, Charlesen
dc.contributor.authorGrimson, Janeen
dc.contributor.authorCoyne, Imeldaen
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-15T12:49:09Z
dc.date.available2010-01-15T12:49:09Z
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.date.submitted2010en
dc.identifier.citationVarley J, Norman Delanty, Charles Normand, Imelda Coyne, Louise McQuaid, Claire Collins, Michael Boland, Jane Grimson, Mary Fitzsimons, Epilepsy in Ireland: Towards the primary-tertiary care continuum, Seizure, 19, 1, 2010, 47 - 52en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/35626
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractBackground Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disease affecting people of every age, gender, race and socio-economic background. The diagnosis and optimal management relies on contribution from a number of healthcare disciplines in a variety of healthcare settings. Objective To explore the interface between primary care and specialist epilepsy services in Ireland. Methods Using appreciative inquiry, focus groups were held with healthcare professionals (n = 33) from both primary and tertiary epilepsy specialist services in Ireland. Results There are significant challenges to delivering a consistent high standard of epilepsy care in Ireland. The barriers that were identified are: the stigma of epilepsy, unequal access to care services, insufficient human resources, unclear communication between primary?tertiary services and lack of knowledge. Improving the management of people with epilepsy requires reconfiguration of the primary?tertiary interface and establishing clearly defined roles and formalised clinical pathways. Such initiatives require resources in the form of further education and training and increased usage of information communication technology (ICT). Conclusion Epilepsy services across the primary?tertiary interface can be significantly enhanced through the implementation of a shared model of care underpinned by an electronic patient record (EPR) system and information communication technology (ICT). Better chronic disease management has the potential to halt the progression of epilepsy with ensuing benefits for patients and the healthcare system.en
dc.description.sponsorshipHealth Research Boarden
dc.format.extent47en
dc.format.extent52en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesSeizureen
dc.relation.ispartofseries19en
dc.relation.ispartofseries1en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectHealth policy and servicesen
dc.subjectEpilepsyen
dc.subjectPrimary careen
dc.subjectTertiary careen
dc.subjectShared careen
dc.subjectElectronic patient recorden
dc.titleEpilepsy in Ireland: Towards the primary-tertiary care continuumen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.sponsorHealth Research Board (HRB)en
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/jgrimsonen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/normandcen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/coyneien
dc.identifier.rssinternalid63049en
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2009.11.002en
dc.subject.TCDThemeNeuroscienceen
dc.identifier.rssurihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.seizure.2009.11.002


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