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dc.contributor.authorGARAVAN, HUGH PATRICK
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-05T15:38:51Z
dc.date.available2009-10-05T15:38:51Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.date.submitted2007en
dc.identifier.citationChambers, C.D., Bellgrove, M.A., Gould, I.C., English, T., Garavan, H., McNaught, E., Kamke, M., & Mattingley, J.B. `Dissociable mechanisms of cognitive control in human prefrontal cortex? in Journal of Neurophysiology, 98, (3), 2007, pp 3638 - 3647en
dc.identifier.otherY
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/33766
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractIntelligent behavior depends on the ability to suppress inappropriate actions and resolve interference between competing responses. Recent clinical and neuroimaging evidence has demonstrated the involvement of prefrontal, parietal, and premotor areas during behaviors that emphasize conflict and inhibition. It remains unclear, however, whether discrete subregions within this network are crucial for overseeing more specific inhibitory demands. Here we probed the functional specialization of human prefrontal cortex by combining repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) with integrated behavioral measures of response inhibition (stop-signal task) and response competition (flanker task). Participants undertook a combined stop-signal/flanker task after rTMS of the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) or dorsal premotor cortex (dPM) in each hemisphere. Stimulation of the right IFG impaired stop-signal inhibition under conditions of heightened response competition but did not influence the ability to suppress a competing response. In contrast, stimulation of the right dPM facilitated execution but had no effect on inhibition. Neither of these results was observed during rTMS of corresponding left-hemisphere regions. Overall, our findings are consistent with existing evidence that the right IFG is crucial for inhibitory control. The observed double dissociation of neurodisruptive effects between the right IFG and right dPM further implies that response inhibition and execution rely on distinct neural processes despite activating a common cortical network.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by a grant from the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council to J. B. Mattingley and C. D. Chambers, the Australian Research Council Grant DP0770337 to M. A. Bellgrove and C. D. Chambers, and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, UK, David Phillips Fellowship held by C. D. Chambers.en
dc.format.extent3638 - 3647en
dc.format.extent618343 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe American Physiological Societyen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Neurophysiologyen
dc.relation.ispartofseries98en
dc.relation.ispartofseries3en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectPsychologyen
dc.titleDissociable mechanisms of cognitive control in human prefrontal cortexen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.sponsorMedical Research Council
dc.contributor.sponsorBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/garavanh
dc.identifier.rssinternalid49642


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