Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDUSPARIC, IVANAen
dc.contributor.authorCAHILL, VINNYen
dc.contributor.authorDUSPARIC, IVANAen
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-17T11:49:47Z
dc.date.available2009-09-17T11:49:47Z
dc.date.createdJuneen
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.date.submitted2008en
dc.identifier.citationIvana Dusparic and Vinny Cahill., Autonomic management of large-scale critical infrastructures., Workshop on Hot Topics in Autonomic Computing, June, IEEE, 2008, 1-2en
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/32850
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.descriptionIn conjunction with the IEEE International Conference on Autonomic Computing ICACen
dc.description.abstractCritical Infrastructures include facilities, services and installations essential for the functioning of a society and economy. Such infrastructures are generally of a very large scale spanning cities, whole countries, or even crossing international borders. Examples of such Large-Scale Critical Infrastructures (LSCI) are electricity, water and gas supply, transportation, and health service [8]. There are many aspects to the management of LSCI, including security, fault tolerance, availability, and reconfiguration. The particular aspect of LSCI management with which we are concerned and which we view as a grand challenges in autonomic computing is optimization of their performance in changing conditions. Not all circumstances in which these systems will operate can be predicted so it is not possible to fully define their behaviour at design time. Even for the known operating conditions, with hundreds or thousands of nodes, it is infeasible, if not impossible, to define correct behaviour for all combinations of conditions on all nodes. Critical infrastructures need to adapt to various changes in load, both sudden ones and repeated load patterns. They need to optimize their performance with respect to multiple, often conflicting or highly dependent, policies with different levels of priority (high, low), affecting different parts of the systems (local, regional, global), either continuously, or in certain cirumstances (sporadically). In our work, Urban Traffic Control (UTC) is used as an exemplar of a LSCI. A UTC systems consist of hundreds of dependent nodes (traffic lights) that need to coordinate their behaviour to deal with optimizing general traffic throughput, prioritizing emergency vehicles and public transport, as well as adapting to any surges of traffic in particular areas in case of public events or accidents.en
dc.format.extent1-2en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIEEEen
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectComputer Scienceen
dc.titleAutonomic management of large-scale critical infrastructures.en
dc.title.alternativeWorkshop on Hot Topics in Autonomic Computingen
dc.typeConference Paperen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/vjcahillen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/dusparien
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/duspariien
dc.identifier.rssinternalid61218en
dc.identifier.rssurihttps://www.cs.tcd.ie/publications/tech-reports/reports.08/TCD-CS-2008-39.pdfen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record