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dc.contributor.authorKELLY, DANIEL
dc.contributor.authorPrendergast, Patrick John
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-14T16:13:29Z
dc.date.available2009-04-14T16:13:29Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.date.submitted2003en
dc.identifier.citationKelly, D. J.; Prendergast, P. J. and Blayney, A. W. `The effect of prosthesis design on vibration of the reconstructed ossicular chain: a comparative finite element analysis of four prostheses? in Otology and Neurotology, 24, (1), 2003, pp 11-19en
dc.identifier.otherY
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/29106
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.description.abstractHypothesis: We hypothesize that the differences in the bioacoustic performance of ossicular replacement prosthesis designs, and insertion positions, can be quantified using finite element analysis. Background: Many designs of prosthesis are available for middle ear surgery. Materials used, and the shape of the implants, differ widely. Advances in computer simulation technologies offer the possibility of replicating the in vivo behavior of the different prostheses. If this can be achieved, insight into the design attributes required for improved biofunctionality may be determined. Methods: Micro CT scanning and NMR imaging were used to obtain geometric information that was translated into a finite element model of the outer and middle ear. The forced frequency response across the hearing range of the normal middle ear was compared to the middle ear reconstructed with partial and total ossicular replacement prostheses (Xomed, Jacksonville, FL and Kurz, Dusslingen Germany). Results: The amplitude of vibration of the footplate was more similar to the normal ear when a Kurz TORP was implanted compared to when a Xomed TORP was implanted; this may be attributed to the latter?s titanium link. PORP prostheses were stiffest and had lower umbo vibrations and higher stapedial footplate vibrations. In all cases bar one the vibration of the prostheses had resonances that caused the vibration of the stapes footplate to be noticeably different from normal. Conclusion: We confirmed the hypothesis that finite element modelling can be used to predict the differences in the response of ossicular replacement prostheses. This study shows that computer simulation can potentially be used to test or optimize the vibro-acoustic characteristics of middle ear implants.en
dc.description.sponsorshipHelena Rowley, MD, FRCSI. (Mater Hospital, Dublin, Ireland) is thanked for removing the ossicular chains from the temporal bones. We also thank Dr. Anders Aiab (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Zurich, Switzerland) for carrying out the micro Computed Topography scans of the ossicles, and Ms Fiona Ryan (Institute of Technology, Tallaght, Co. Dublin, Ireland) for doing the measurements with the coordinate measurement machine. This study was supported entirely from a research grant from the Health Research Board, Dublin, Ireland.en
dc.format.extent11en
dc.format.extent19en
dc.format.extent614492 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWolters Kluweren
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOtology & Neurotology: Official Publication Of The American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [And] European Academy Of Otology And Neurotologyen
dc.relation.ispartofseries24en
dc.relation.ispartofseries1en
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjectMechanical & Manufacturing Engineeringen
dc.titleThe effect of prosthesis design on vibration of the reconstructed ossicular chain: a comparative finite element analysis of four prosthesesen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.contributor.sponsorHealth Research Board
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/kellyd9
dc.identifier.rssinternalid17937


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