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dc.contributor.authorPAVIA, SARAen
dc.contributor.editorCannon, E.en
dc.contributor.editorWest, R.en
dc.contributor.editorFanning, P.en
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-02T14:35:39Z
dc.date.available2009-02-02T14:35:39Z
dc.date.createdDecember 2008en
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.date.submitted2008en
dc.identifier.citationS. Pavia, A petrographic study of the technology of hydraulic mortars at masonry bridges, harbours and mill ponds., Concrete Research and Bridge Infrastructure Symp., Galway, December 2008, Cannon E., West, R. and Fanning P., Galileo Editions, 2008, 253, 264en
dc.identifier.otherY
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.otherYen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/27159
dc.descriptionPUBLISHEDen
dc.descriptionGalwayen
dc.description.abstractMasonry mortars for underwater works such as bridge piers, harbours and mill ponds are of hydraulic nature. This paper investigates the raw materials and production technology of a number of these mortars. It focuses on the assessment of hydraulicity and the phenomena of delayed sulfate formation and alkali silica reaction (ASR) leading to damage. Hydraulicity is probably the most important property of a binder. Not only it governs a mortar?s cohesiveness and intrinsic bond therefore ruling physical properties and durability, but it also determines site application and performance. Samples of mortars from several structures including Annesley Bridge, St John?s Bridge, Dun Laoghaire Harbour and Dundrum Millpond were analyzed with petrography and X-ray diffraction. All the mortars displayed evidence of eminent binder hydraulicity including unhydrated clinker relics of different composition and hydraulic minerals. The identification of specific hydraulic minerals was difficult under the microscope, however, both irresolvable C-S-H, portlandite and other unidentified hydraulic phases were recorded. Blast furnace slags undergoing hydraulic reaction were noted, suggesting the addition of artificial pozzolans; and reactive aggregate showing pozzolanic reaction was also found. In relation to mortar durability, secondary reactions involving microsilica aggregate (ASR) leading to fracturing by expansion were evidenced; and delayed ettringite formation was also common in the mortars studied.en
dc.format.extent989728 bytes
dc.format.extent253en
dc.format.extent264en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGalileo Editionsen
dc.rightsYen
dc.subjecthydraulicityen
dc.subjectclinker relictsen
dc.subjectASRen
dc.subjectsulfationen
dc.subjectetringitteen
dc.subjectpozzolansen
dc.titleA petrographic study of the technology of hydraulic mortars at masonry bridges, harbours and mill ponds.en
dc.title.alternativeConcrete Research and Bridge Infrastructure Symp.en
dc.typeConference Paperen
dc.type.supercollectionscholarly_publicationsen
dc.type.supercollectionrefereed_publicationsen
dc.identifier.peoplefinderurlhttp://people.tcd.ie/paviasen
dc.identifier.rssinternalid54991en


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